Hot answers tagged

19

Maybe I disagree with the FAQ here, but my personal opinion is that even trivial changes like this improve the quality of the material on the site and are fine as long as the fix something that is clearly an error. I suspect the rule around "substantial" is to discourage gaming the editor badges without making real contributions. I'll admit that I do edits ...


10

If I'm reading an answer and see one of these (it's, their, etc) I'm just as likely to do a quick edit as to move on, depending on my time. I'm with John, I disagree with FAQ. I view it as being the custodian of a long lived document that has my name attached to it. Typos happen, due to mistakes, and due to crazy auto-correct with various applications. In ...


8

I might be inclined to reject an edit if they fix a single problem where many other obvious problems exist. If you're going to edit, copy-edit the whole post please. :)


7

My first experiences with Stack Exchange were on WordPress Development. Early on, I tried fixing the grammar on a few posts and got my suggested edits rejected. The reason given was that the edits were too minor and not substantial. So I quit doing it. However, on a few sites now (including this one), I am a 2k user with the edit privilege, which means ...


3

In the spirit of member Ben's Miller's concern, that SE tends more towards deleting rather than saving, I'd say the edits were on target. The last thing I want is another thing to address via FAQ, but I would suggest there's a distinction between: The edit-reject reason that the edit conflicts with the author's intent vs A wholesale edit that produces a ...


2

mhorans's answer is right. We don't address this explicitly in the tour/TOS, etc, but did discuss a bit with regard to saving questions that were off-topic, but at the same time, interesting, and just needed minor edits to be on-topic. We agreed (somewhere. can't find that discussion now) that if there were answers already, the edits should respect the ...


2

You can roll back the edit, if the change to the question invalidates the answers by fundamentally changing the scope and point of the question. Of course that can spark a edit war....


2

How about adding a bracketed note referring to the editing correction? Square bracketed notes are often used by editors to indicate changes made by a person other than the original author. e.g.: Every currency I can think of or have ever used is 'decimal' [was: 'metric'] ... ... then the top answer still makes sense. Another alternative perhaps is to ...


2

I do appreciate the effort, and in general I think this is not a bad idea. I have also made some major rewrites to questions in the past to try to keep them from getting closed or to try to reopen. I haven’t reviewed any of your edits, but I want to share some thoughts about the practice. Again, I’m not saying that these apply to your edits on this ...


1

Some one or two word edits to titles can actually make it clear what the actual question is, as some non-native English speakers use odd grammar which in some cases inverts or disguises the question at hand.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible